The Prognosis for Participatory Care

As “The Innovator’s Partner,” we embrace new ideas and the big impact they can have in addressing disease and improving health. We are passionately enthusiastic about the role we and our clients can play in enhancing each patient’s journey, care, and outcomes. But what do health care providers—in whose hands the fate of many of these new tools and treatments rest—think about all this innovation? Do they get as excited as we do? For some, the answer appears to be, “Not so much.” Significant numbers of docs are in fact reluctant to embrace new diagnostic methods and tools, slow to adopt electronic health...

The (New) Ethics of Medical Privacy

I recently had the opportunity to attend a screening of Here.Us.Now., a documentary funded by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. It should be required viewing for anyone who touches the health care system, which includes pretty much everyone. The film tells the story of Chris and Hugh Hempel’s medical odyssey in the wake of their twin daughters’ diagnosis with a rare, incurable disease called Niemann-Pick Type C. I can’t get this film out of my head.   Why? Because it not only tells the Hempels’ story rationally and beautifully, it uses their narrative to absolutely nail the bigger issues facing any family desperately...

Personalized, More or Less

We live in an increasingly impersonal world. We hide behind technology. We text instead of talking – sometimes when we’re in the same room. We shop online. We “share” virtually. Yet — and, to some degree, as a result — we also live in a world where information about us is more widely available than ever, creating the ability to hyper-personalize communication and track our every move (as the Ed Snowden revelations remind us). So what does this emerging tension—the impersonal nature of technology-driven interchange vs. the personalization enabled by the vast array of data trailing behind such...

A Bluebird on My Shoulder…

The recent bluebird bio IPO has further buoyed expectations for gene therapy, early stage biotech and rare diseases. Is the euphoria justified? Perhaps for investors. But bluebird still has a ways to go before it has an approved therapy, as do other recent biotech IPO winners. So, what can we infer from the market’s Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah mindset – particularly in the face of so many concerns elsewhere? A couple of things, I think: They see rare diseases as a category likely to avoid being squeezed by downward pricing pressures from the Affordable Care Act and the broader burden of health costs in our economy. Thus, the potential payoff...

Here’s to the Next 25

Feinstein Kean Healthcare has spent the past 25 years laboring productively in the vineyards of disruptive innovation. The firm was born in the cradle of biotech and worked with many of the industry’s pioneers. We were there in the early days of stem cell research, oncogenes and immunotherapies, nanotech, many of the “omics” and, more recently, big data, cognitive gaming and the digitization of medicine. We’ve helped to open up entirely new categories of treatment in many disease areas, and changed the mindset in others. We were the first in the communications industry to anticipate the impact of personalized medicine—and (thanks...